How should I respond for children, split custody and college students?

New Children

Congratulations on welcoming your new bundle of joy! If your baby was born on or before April 1, 2020, remember to count him/her on the 2020 Census. Learn more on the U.S. Census Bureau handout.

It’s Complicated

During the 2010 Census, as many as 1 million children were not accounted for. There is no reason why children should be unaccounted for in the census. If your child truly spends equal time between both homes, the child should be counted where he/she stayed on April 1, 2020. If a timesharing agreement is temporary or unclear, the parent or guardian of the child shall count the child if they are with them on April 1, 2020, grandparents with custody included. Learn more on the U.S. Census Bureau handout.

College Students

When responding to the 2020 Census, college students should be counted where they live and sleep most of the time as of April 1, 2020. For most students, that means in their college town, not back home with their parents.  Parents or guardians should only include children in college who live with them full time during the school year. Learn more about accounting for college students on the U.S. Census Bureau website.

Show All Answers

1. How is Census data collected?
2. What if I don't have internet access?
3. Will I receive an email or text from the Census Bureau?
4. Do I have to participate?
5. How should I respond for children, split custody and college students?
6. How should non-English speakers or foreign citizens respond?
7. How should renters and snowbirds respond?
8. How should I respond for family or relatives residing at a memory care, senior living or nursing center?
9. How should I respond for family members in the military?
10. Other unique living arrangements